The choice of which fruit tree varieties to plant in a garden orchard depends on many factors in addition to personal preferences. In addition to differences in climatic conditions in the various counties of the UK, there are many other factors which have a great influence on the health and well-being of the trees in order to do well. Fruit trees can be long-lived, and to a large degree they are capable of looking after themselves, provided the site is suitable and the planting has been done with care.

 

Tree variety index with descriptions

Read an article about how to choose which apple tree varieties to plant

Please click on the varieties below to see a photo and description of the variety:

Apple varieties:

Adams Pearmain
Annie Elizabeth
Arthur Turner
Ashmead Kernel
Beauty of Bath
Blenheim Orange
Bountiful
Braeburn
Bramleys Seedling
Charles Ross
Cheddar Cross
Chiver’s Delight
Claygate Pearmain
Court Pendu Plat
Cox’s Orange Pippin
Cox Self Fertile
Crawley Beauty
Crispin
D’Arcy Spice
Discovery
Doctor Harvey
Duke of Devonshire
Edward VII
Egremont Russet
Ellison’s Orange
Elstar
Exeter Cross
Fiesta
Golden Delicious
Golden Noble
Granny Smith
Greensleeves
Grenadier
Herefordshire Russet
Howgate Wonder
Ingrid Marie
James Grieve
Jonagold
Jupiter
Katy
Kidds Orange Red
Lanes Prince Albert
Laxton’s Epicure
Laxton’s Fortune
Laxton’s Superb
Lord Lambourne
Newton Wonder
Norfolk Beefing
Orleans Reinette
Peasgood Nonsuch
Pinova
Pixie
Princesse
Red Falstaff
Red Pippin
Rev. W. Wilks
Rosemary Russet
Royal Gala
Saturn
Scrumptious
Scotch Dumpling
Sops in Wine
Spartan
Star Apple
St. Edmunds Russet
Suffolk Pink
Sunset
Suntan
Tom Putt
Tydeman’s Late Orange
Warner’s King
Winston
Winter Wonder
Worcester Pearmain

Cider Apple Varieties:

Camelot
Ellis Bitter
Dabinett
Kingston Black
Hereford Redstreak
Tom Putt

Pear Tree Varieties:

Beth
Beurre Hardy
Concorde
Conference
Doyenne du Comice
Invincible
Josephine de Malines
Onward
Packham’s Triumph
Sensation
William Bon Chretien
Winter Nelis

Quinces:

Meeches Early Prolific
Vranja

Plum and greengage trees:

Avalon
Belle de Louvain
Cambridge Gage
Coes Golden Drop
Czar
Denniston’s Superb
Early Laxton
Early Transparent Gage
Excalibur
Giant Prune
Herman
Jubilee
Kirkes Blue
Marjorie’s Seedling
Mirabelle de Nancy
Old Green Gage
Opal
Ouillins Golden Gage
President
Purple Pershore
Rivers Early Prolific
Swan
Victoria

Damson Trees:

Farleigh Damson
Merryweather Damson
Shropshire Prune (damson)

Cherry Trees:

Compact Stella
Kordia
Lapins
Merton Glory
Morello
Regina
Stella
Sylvia
Summer Sun
Sunburst
Van

Apricots:

Early Moorpark
Golden Glow
Moorpark

Peaches:

Peregrine
Rochester

Nectarines:

Lord Napier

Medlar:

Nottingham

Figs:

Brown Turkey
Brunswick
White Marseilles

Crab Apples:

Malus aldenhamensis (Wine Red crab apple)
Malus Chestnut Crab
Malus evereste
Malus floribunda (crab apple)
Malus Harry Baker
Malus hupehensis
Malus John Downie
Malus × moerlandsii Profusion
Malus Pink Glow
Malus x robusta Red Sentinel
Malus Royalty
Malus × scheideckeri Sun Rival
Malus Van Eseltine
Malus Wisley Crab
Malus x zumi Golden Hornet

Other ornamental trees and fruits

Cobnut or Hazel

Morus nigra – mulberry tree, producing edible fruit

Walnut

Raspberries – how to grow raspberry canes

Why the correct choice of fruit tree is paramount to success

In principle, there are four fundamental factors that determine success in growing top fruit outdoors: site, soil, weather conditions and type of fruit planted. Under the heading top fruit we can place apples, pears, greengages, plums, cherries, quinces, walnuts, sweet chestnuts, hazelnuts and medlars. If you are planning to purchase and plant trees, it is essential to ensure that the trees are suitable for your area. Fruit trees will grow in most areas of the UK. However, successful growing and cropping is another matter. It is a good idea to obtain good advice to avoid disappointment.

Which type of tree fruit carries the least risk and is successful on most soils in the UK? Undoubtedly this is apple. Choice of variety is important, as normally it is colder in the north of England. Temperature during blossom time is of great importance in order to secure a good fruit set. Also in the northerly counties the type of pollinator will have to be chosen carefully.

A second question of importance is this; which type of fruit is more able to cope with areas of high rain fall? Plums and pears, provided the soil is not too acid, usually do well in the higher rainfall areas. Pears in particular are very sensitive to droughty conditions and thin soils. Cherries love deep soils. Greengages need the right companion in order to crop well. Cherries and greengages are more suited to central and southern counties. This does not apply to Morello cherries as these trees flower later.

What about peaches, nectarines and apricots? These fruits have a much higher demand of warmth and hours of sunshine during the growing season. However, if grown on the right rootstock and placed against a wall facing south, with sufficient t.l.c. and regular watering during dry and warm periods, during the summer months, the net result often is excellent.

Geographical factors

In addition, geographical factors also affect the choice of trees. For example, in the northern counties, climatic conditions are substantially different compared with East Anglia. The average temperatures during the growing season are 2 to 3 degrees lower. This results in a shorter period in which the fruit has to mature and develop its full flavour. The same applies to the West Country; here the rainfall is substantially greater compared with the east of the country. Some well-known varieties of apple trees are not suitable for high rainfall areas. Other apple tree varieties are very suitable and excel.

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